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, the profile including funerals for prominent african-americans or commemorations of civil right events of which the clintons have been present. marking the hundredth anniversary of the largest african-american sorority. >> the idea that in the 21st century african-americans would wait in line to vote for ten hours while whites in an affluent precinct next door waited just ten minutes, or that african-americans would receive fliers telling them the wrong time and day to exercise their constitutional rights, that is not the america we expect or the america we want for our children. >> well, in the article in the "new york times" i mentioned, former virginia governor the first elected african-american governor in the country recalled a conversation with bill clinton in may this way. i'd be less than honest, the governor said, if i didn't tell you i came away convinced that there was no question about her running. joy reid is msnbc contributor and eugene robinson columnist at "the washington post" and msnbc political analyst. you're smiling, joy. i think it's for me, but maybe it's about t
and excessive force, which are federal civil rights violations. concord city attorney mark coon told me he doesn't comment on pending litigation but the city will defend a lawsuit. joe vasquez kpix 5. >>> a popular cable tv host bill was killed in a motorcycle crash in san francisco. he cohosted the show curb appeal on hdtv. a car struck and killed him last night as he rhode through the lower. you can still see evidence from the crash near oak and stiener. it's not clear who was at fault. police say the driver of the car is cooperating. beckwith was 38 years old. >>> new clue tonight in the search for that missing san jose pilot and his family. betty yu says the crews have a much better idea of where that plane went down. >> the smiths are a tight-knit mormon family. after spending thanksgiving weekend in oregon, silicon valley xhektive dale smith left for montana. his son daniel and his son's wife, his daughter amber and her fiance were in his beach bonanza similar to the one pictured here. it ran into engine trouble over central idaho sunday. smith intend today land at the remote johnson creek
and the city of concord for wrongful arrest and excessive force federal civil rights violations. concord city attorney says he doesn't comment on pending litigation but that the city will defend the lawsuit. joe vazquez, kpix 5. >>> judy rogers the chef and co- ownerrer of sunni cafe died from cancer on monday night. the market street restaurant was packed last night as you can see. rogers worked at zuni for more than 25 years. she wontons of awards. but she was most famous -- she won tons of award but she was most famous for her roast chicken. >> i'll miss her. she had a big heart. she was compassionate, kind and strong. >> employees put up pictures and cards thanking rogers for being a good friend and mentor. she was 57. >>> a new clue in the search for a missing san jose pilot and his family. betty yu reports. >> reporter: the smiths are a tight-knit mormon family. after spending thanksgiving weekend in oregon, silicon valley executive dale smith left for montana. his son daniel and his son's wife, his daughter amber and her fiance were in his beech bonanza similar to this one. it ran into
and bright to listen to both sides. it is right to be civil and right to care about what the other people have to say and that's a model that we desperately need today and that's another reason i wanted to write this book read. .. a couple more hours to go this afternoon, and now joining us here on our set in miami is jeremy scahill. here he is, his most recent book, "dirty wars: the world is a battlefield. " mr. scahill, earlier you were on a panel with dan balz and george packer, and one of the questioners asked you what do you see as the difference between how the bush administration and the obama administration approach the war on terror. >> right. , i mean, i think first of all it's great to be with you here on c-span and booktv. the bush with administration, i don't want to understate how atrocious i think that period was in american foreign policy. it really was like murder incorporated. the destruction of iraq, the creation of the cia black sites, the idea that the geneva convention was -- [inaudible] the abu ghraib torture, using guantanamo, you could go on and on in characterizi
's deputies face federal charges in a civil rights and corruption case. the announcement today alleged beatings of inmates and jail visitors, unjustified detentions and conspiracy to obstruct a federal investigation. the probe focuses on the county jail system, the nation's largest. princeton university began immunizing nearly 6,000 students today against "type b" meningitis. the outbreak was deemed so serious that the food and drug administration authorized use of a vaccine not licensed in the u.s. since march, eight people at princeton have been stricken by the potentially fatal disease. it's spread through kissing, coughing and other contact. the federal bailout of general motors is officially over. the treasury sold its remaining shares in the automaker today. in the end, the net cost to taxpayers was $10.5 billion. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained five points to close at 16,025. the nasdaq rose six points to close at 4,068. >> ifill: still to come on the "newshour": tech giants call for limits on spying; disarming rebels in the central african repu
. it started with jesse helms. i rest my case. >> and strom thurmond. >> because after the civil rights act of 1964 was passed, they were very irate that the democratic party was becoming inclusive in all kinds of ways, especially racial. they started to -- 8000 fundamentalist baptist churches -- they took over the republican party levers of power gradually, so now you cannot get through the primaries to get into the general election as a smart, centrist conservative whatever, a perfectly sensible person. it is so dangerous to have one of our two parties controlled by extremists. of course, we get mad at the democrats. i am mad at the democrats every minute. then you find yourself voting for this other party. here's my plan. my plan is that we do what the right-wing democrats did and we go to the local caucuses and so on. even i am willing to look republican. i will take off this belt. [laughter] [applause] >> do you like my jacket? >> yes. we will infiltrate the caucuses. that is what they did. we will take them over. in four years, you will have a chaotic and terrible republican conventio
in the civil rights movement the anti-apartheid movement was our opportunity to participate in that way. >> that's so true. we have to leave it there. congresswoman, safe travels. april, thank you for being with me. >> thank you. >>> when question come back, why is it acceptable for a 23-year-old offered $3 billion for an app but $3 billion seems like too much to keep a promise to workers who earned it? workers in an american city. that's coming up. turn to roc® retinol correxion®. one week, fine lines appear to fade. one month, deep wrinkles look smoother. after one year, skin looks ageless. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. take skincare to the next level with new roc® multi correxion® 5 in 1, proven to hydrate dryness, illuminate dullness, lift sagging, diminish the look of dark spots, and smooth the appearance of wrinkles. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. yes. cup your hands together for me. rub it all the way up your hands. any exposed skin. and get the backs of your hands too. put some just around your neck. [ bell rings ] you're good to go. okay great
with luis. she also became very interested in civil rights. we have a problem at that time was a white supremacist group in town, and she held a group of people lobby to get a unanimous vote in the legislature for a law allowing civil damages for civil harassment. that brought an end to that white supremacist compound that gave coeur d'alene a pretty bad name sometimes. she didn't want anyone to be known for that. at one point people and urged her to for governor, and share the name recognition. she had the people behind or. she had a lot of the things that any of the politicians would want, and she knew it. but she didn't. she chose not to. for several reasons, and i talk about them in the book but i think the biggest, she was not one to say her own name over and over. she preferred to work behind the scenes. and became one of those people that worked in the senator's office, and the congressman's office, the governor's office, to get things done outside the political fight. i came here 20 years ago to be the pastor of her church. i count in the book some interesting little stories. o
to compound. so the two things i end up by saying, i'm reminded of something the civil rights leader when he said we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all in the same boat now. what's going on in this town is that too often, the two political parties, you think they're from different countries. they view the other side as the enemy, not the fell blow citizens with whom they occasionally disagree. but in the long run, they have the sate fate, interests in common. we have to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. but we forget we come from a common country and common heritage and for sure a common destiny. final thing i say, this is something that no labels is working to overcome. in this city today, what all of you have to do every section is forge principle compromise, the word compromise, back in the dale, my father's time, that was an act of statesmanship. today it's a act of betrayal. if you don't work with your party 100% of the time, you're ostracized, there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv and a variety of other things. i'll
of so much history, working with civil rights leaders like reverend jesse jackson, corretja scott king and eleanor holmes norton. mary frann sis berry, the former commissioner of the civil rights commission, eeoc and robinson would transafrica. i was a kid during those days. they were organizing protests outside the south african embassy. my job was to help find and identify people who would get arrested, to keep the movement alive. it was a very tremendous moment and opportunity, but later i had an opportunity, working on a clinton/gore campaign and nelson mandela after visiting harlem in the 1990s, wanted to come to the inaugural of bill clinton. he had great affection and respect and admiration for bill and hillary clinton. i was an advanced person back during those days. i helped to escort him around. my good friend, yolanda, who was in that picture, it was a great moment. later i had an opportunity to go to south africa and other places to help train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know
or government defendants. thus attorneys' fees provisions are mostly found in civil right, environmental protection and other statutes. the provision in this bill differs from other congressional exceptions in that it would require anyone who loses a patent claim to pay the attorneys' fees of even large corporate defendants. this is a giant deterrent to genuine inventors from filing good-faith suits to defend their valid patents claims. therefore i urge the adoption of the watt-conyers substitute which would drop the losers pays provisions from the underlying bill while still including the key reforms that are present in the underlying bill and in the senate bill drafted by senate -- senator leahy. i urge adoption of the substitute and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from new york yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. chairman, at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from california who has been a great person to work with on the judiciary committee and here on the floor of the house on this legis
the modern mother of the civil rights movement, rosa parks. this past sunday, we celebrated the 58th anniversary of rosa parks refusing to give up her seat on that bus in montgomery, alabama. i am so proud to stand here from the great state of ohio because it was the great state of ohio that was the first state in this nation to name december 1 rosa parks day. on thursday and friday of this week in our district, we will bring people from all over the state to pay tribute to her. and we will bring in more than 600 little children who will learn about civil rights and understand the value of working together. the last day, 1955, she started something larger than herself. she stood -- she sat down so we could stand up. mr. speaker, it is my honor to be a part of the legislation that created december 1 in ohio as rosa parks day. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speake
people who make the civil war chest set or whatever. right? it's like a lead list. >> it's for your own good. >> the "los angeles times" piece says they were shocked. they didn't even complete the application process and they were getting phone calls. take heart in peter levy. he says, i can imagine some people may be upset but i can see some people will be comforted and relieved to get help navigating the website. >> your average sleazy marketer knows he's a sleazy marketer operating over a space above a starbucks. these people are doing it because they feel they have a moral right to do it. you ought to be grateful they're giving away your information to no one you've never heard of. >> it's okay for big government to do it but not mom and pop shops who have to adhere to the do not call list. >> or the do not e-mail list or canned spam act. >> it doesn't apply to the government. >> it's all because they're trying to make their deadline. that's the arg gurmt that cover california is making, too, hey, we have these deadlines for enrollment numbers and we're behind schedule so we have to
human rights first. he'll talk about balancing national security and civil liberties. that starts at 1:15 eastern here on c-span2. >> i didn't get the idea for the dummies series. i had an idea to do a beginning book about computers, about it specifically. i kind of inspired myself to do that u just daling with people in the magazine editing job i had had. being on the radio at that time. and being out in the public and talking to people about computers. it was obviously that people wanted to learn more but that the material we had available at the time just wasn't doing the job. we had beginner box on how to use computers. but they sucked. they just didn't have that, you know, they were condescending. they were pate nice. the author was arrogant. well, you'll never get the stuff anyway or iowa, look, this is cool. people didn't want to know that. they wanted to use a computer. they planned to publish one book, and even then there was some reluctancy with the title when the owner found out they had this book. he's like you can't offend the reader. cancel that book. and unfortunately, w
civil society here around the world and everybody in this room. we should feel just as strongly as defending human right activist whether they are in egypt, russia, china, vietnam nam or any other country who are persecuted for religious beliefs or personal beliefs. these are rights we take for advantage. we should not hesitate to speak up when those rights are violated. i have met some activist who have been subjected to brutal y brutality, isolation, torture. and i am in awe by their courage and spirit and by the fact they never give up. we have a responsibility to support them. when they are in prison, this is something democrats and republicans set aside party labels, join together and work for their release. here at home, we have yet to fully recover from the effects of the 9-11 attacks. we continue to mourn the losses of innocent lives that day. we do remain vigilant against the threat of fume future attacks. but we cannot ignore it damage done by the policies put in place after 9-11. before 9-11 i doubt any of us could imagine torture, something members in both congress
kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that question. that there is a lot of variation between the states and the federal systems, and that is really one of the things that we found was that there is so much of a difference between a federal standards and the states, and the states really have so much variation between them. some of them -- the rules are state, soto the you have the separation of powers, you have the state rights. they would have a really unique form and unique standards. i could give examples of your interested. host: sure. guest: in new jersey, they asked the justices to discuss if they own any property in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina, they asked for any -- if any
or their legislatures judicial appointments and those kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that qu
or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad
to describe what's going on. because that's part of the problem. so i don't see it as a civil war. i see it as -- i see it as what happens when a party is out of power, and there isn't one unifying voice. if i ask you guys right now, you are knitting over there, who is the leader of the republican party today? [inaudible] >> he's my friend. i would tell him he got one person in new hampshire. [inaudible] >> who do you think is the leader of the party? >> it isn't jon boehner. he has no control over the pulpit or even in the senate look at ted cruz. ted cruz wouldn't say mitch mcconnell is the leader by any means. i think it's just so loose and -- i would like to process a chris christie. >> that's the point. if i went around the sherman act and as everybody who the leader of the republican party is, either we get no answers or 40 different answers. so when you don't have somebody that sets the standard, sets the tone, this happened. people start talking. you start sounding a little dysfunctional like you're suffering from multiple -- multiple personality disorder. that is happening to re
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)